In Memory

Mike Libbey



 
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07/12/12 02:11 AM #1    

A. B. Paulson

 

My older sister had gone to Southwest with Mike’s sister, so there was a connection to his family. They were well-off, his dad owned a construction company, I think. His workmen fixed up a ‘54 Mercury with  a big chevy engine for Mike. He was a fearless driver after midnight, running red lights at 60 mph.

About the time of our senior prom he’d got in trouble for possessing syringes and drugs. Eventually I heard that he over-dosed in a motel while in his thirties, but by that time he looked about 50.

Mike was a good singer, and a skilled player of the 5-string banjo. For a quiet guy most people didn’t notice, there was something crazily heroic about the extreme risks he took.


09/15/12 01:19 AM #2    

Bill Voedisch

To expand on Paulson's comments, Mike had twin older sisters, maybe SW '57.

I knew Mike early, from Lake Harriet School and our church, St John's.  We were also part of the sailing slugs down at Lake Harriet, he more than I.  Watson was the biggy sailor!

As a scrub from Thomas avenue, I always thought those on Richfield Road and Linden Hills Blvd were the upper crust:  Libby, Mike NIchols, Jimmy Olson, Svare's, Knapp, Leighton, Poehler, Coppage, Shipkey.

Mike was taking some wrong tunrs even in grade school.  But mostly I remember his great smile and crazy laugh.

His father was a builder and an architect of some note.

 

Bill Voedisch

 


01/10/14 10:53 PM #3    

Andrew Quirt

I knew Mike in grade school, as well as in hghschool,  We had doubled dated a couple of times, although he stayed far away from his lady friends, A nice, bright, troubled soul, who was gay before that was an acceptable option.  That frustration led him to drugs, and his untimely death.  He had a "club" for male members - no pun intended, in which membership  involved poloroid genital pictures.  I was invited, without dislousure of the details, but warned off by other members.  A shame that he was born into the society of the fifties, instead of the twentifirst centuy. He was what he was born to be, an untimely fit into an unaccepting society. 


01/12/14 05:49 PM #4    

Bruce Allyn

Mike was a friend from Lake Harriet Grade School on.  I remember when his dad gave him a tractor: or kind of a tractor, it had an engine and four wheels on a frame.   We rode this thing around with as many as five kids hanging on  It was a great adventure until we discovered too late that you had to put oil in engines.  

I can imagine how the police would respond today.  We were all in grade school, Andy Quirt, Mike Knox, myself and others driving around the neighborhood. 

As Andy Quirt said, being gay in the 50’s meant Mike could not feel okay anywhere.   When we got to SW and puberty arrived, he approached his old friends to join his sex club.  I think we all turned him down politely without stinging barbs because of our long history.  But it may have been different as he broadened his search for like-minded souls.  He became less open and reckless.  I got the feeling that he was not sure he valued life very much.  Today he could have found acceptance and lived a happier life.

 


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